February in April — With Benefits

Musings and images about winter, which is slow to yield …

icicles descending from a roof eave

Winter has come just as the calendar ordered up spring. Days are longer but just as cold.

After teasing us for a few days, Mother Nature blessed us with snow here at the base of the mountain, day after day. (I write “blessed” because we need the precipitation to avoid drought.)

We wish this had happened a while ago.

However, this does give me occasion to share some new poems by my dear friend Mary Ellen Honsaker, who enjoys playing with haiku. Wherever you are reading this, and whatever your weather, I hope you enjoy them.


sunrise over snow
bright sun brings its warmth
but wind from the mountain snow
steals summer from us
Pine trees in snowfall
yesterday snow fell
I hoped it would continue
but it was brief lace
Foothills with a little snow
Cold sun lies of warmth
step out and disappointment
pulls your down coat close
Fireplace
Taste of fine whiskey
on a cold night warms the soul
and wakens old dreams


Bighorn sheep grazing
Red cliffs lead sheep down
like the shepherd from the fold
watered, fed, they climb

Bird on a roof

A bird, refugee
in my cold stove this morning,
bursts in, illegal

seeking warmth he came
only to find dark passage
to a strange prison

escape to windows
keeping him from sky beyond,
settled down at last

we spoke, quiet chirps
understanding only voice
that sought to ease fear

caught with soft tossed cloth,
gentle hand our only touch
carried him hidden

out through my porch door
opened folds transfixed our eyes
a moment, then gone

Did he know my heart
would have welcomed the visit
for a bit longer?

Asylum granted
and promised if ever need
wings this way again


Haiku poetry © Mary Ellen Honsaker 2022

Thanks for reading!

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Who’s writing? Check out About Me.

Author: LivingDubois

I am a retired science journalist, devoted to enjoying and recording the many pleasures of life in the Wyoming's Upper Wind River Valley.

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